review

Hexcells Review

The name “Matthew Brown” probably doesn’t reside in the minds of many, but if you’ve ventured into the puzzle game scene on Steam, you’ve likely encountered at least one of his games. Brown is responsible for the Logic Puzzle Pack , consisting of the Hexcells trilogy and its successors, SquareCells and CrossCells. These games are simple indie puzzle games that follow a common art style and design philosophy, and some of them are downright brilliant.
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review

Bioshocks

BioShock Almost a decade after the release of the acclaimed System Shock 2, its legacy was reborn in the form of the first BioShock. If you’ve played SS2, BioShock won’t feel too alien at all, though it is more forgiving. It has an excellent story (up until the end), a world filled with exploration (up until the end), and clunky but still enjoyable combat (up until the end). Both games take place in a crumbling oasis amidst an uninhabitable environment.
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Q.U.B.E. Review

Q.U.B.E. is clearly a game made to follow in the gargantuan footsteps of the mighty Portal, which shook so many small developers and made everyone realize what a puzzle game should look like. It follows a very similar aesthetic trend, with the pristine white-paneled environment gradually giving way to a more industrial and decrepit theme as the structure you’ve been solving puzzles in begins falling to pieces. You wake up inside the qube with no information on how you got there or what it is.
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SUPERHOT Review

SUPERHOT is an indie sci-fi FPS released in 2016 by SUPERHOT Team. After a long wait, it certainly lived up to my expectations. SUPERHOT employs a very simple design: a standard FPS with one-shot kills, but where time only moves while you move. If you stand still, everything else slows to a crawl. If you start moving, the world around you starts moving as well. This mechanic is very well-implemented and it leads to an entirely new dimension of gameplay.
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review

Prey Review

I almost feel guilty not being able to discuss the original Prey (2006), as it’s not even available on Steam anymore. Prey (2017), which will be referred to simply as ‘Prey’, is certainly paying homage to something, but that something is not a linear first-person shooter. Prey is both an “immersive sim” [a name which feels more apt to something like Elite: Dangerous than a game like Prey, Dishonored, or BioShock ] and a game with open-ended and non-linear level design simultaneously.
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